“The pearl in the necklace of India” so called Sri Lanka is and the islet sets its magnificent existence in the mighty Indian ocean. Only 430 Km in length, 225 Km in width, making an area of just 65,525 Square Km, it provides a haven to a multi ethnic, multi religious and multi cultural society that mirrors the continuous arrivals of foreign immigrants.

The Veddas , The indigenous people of Sri Lanka still live in jungles firmly adhering to their primal way of life. North Indian settlers known as Sinhalese, arrived in the island around the 5th Century BC and formed settlements. There after arrived the settlers from South India in the 7th Century AD, Known as Tamils.

Then came the Moorish traders from Arabia, touched the shores of Sri Lanka where they discovered not only a store-house of precious stones but many other fascinations too, founded trading settlements. “…diamond are in its rivers and pearls in its valleys” so described Sri Lanka was by Sinbad, the sailor of “Arabian Nights”. Ibn Batuta who visited the island around 1334 AD and made pilgrimage to Adam’s Peak, describes the trees “with leaves that never fall” and the red roses “as large as the palm of the hand”.

Then in search of spices and new lands arrived the Europeans from 1500s to 1800s, conquered Sri Lanka, blending Portuguese, Dutch and British hues till its independence in 1948. “Ceylon was the cradle of the human race because everyone there looks an original” so convinced George Bernard Shaw.

This peculiar island is a must visited tourist destination in the world and the echo of its hypnotic melodies will definitely pull your heartstrings towards it when once visited.

Visa & Immigration

It is easy to obtain a tourist/business visa. The ETA can be obtained On-Line by logging on to www.eta.gov.lk and following the instructions. The cost is US$20 as a standard for all countries for processing the visa prior to arrival. For South Asian (SAARC) countries the cost is US$10. For children under the age of 12 there is no charge.

Those who arrive at the airport without a prior visa will also be able to obtain a visa at the port of arrival. The cost will be US$25 for all countries and US$15 for South Asian (SAARC) countries. You can also obtain visas at Sri Lankan embassies abroad.

Climate in Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka displays a wide variety of climatic conditions depending on the time of year and region. The low lands and coastal areas have a mean temperature of 27°C, offering the perfect weather for beach worthy endeavors. As you proceed to the hill climate a much cooler setting awaits you, with a mean temperature of 20°C in lower areas and around 15°C at higher elevations. The island also has two monsoon seasons and in the south west a dry season which last from December to March and a wet season which lasts from May to August. While the island’s North and East regions which are comparatively dry, enjoying a monsoon from October to January and a dry season that lasts from May to September.

When to visit Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka is a year round destination with an abundance of sunshine all year round. The average temperature is around 27°C – 30°C in most parts of island. The temperature gradually drops as the land rises towards the hill country, with some parts of the highland as low as below 10°C at night. The island has two wet monsoon seasons: briefly between May and July in the south-west region and between December and January in the north-east. However, clear blue skies and bright sunny days are usual even during the wet season, when tropical showers and storms don’t last long. Sri Lanka is 51/2 hours ahead of GMT (Greenwich Mean Time), 2½ hours behind Singapore and 4½ hours behind Australia EST (Eastern Standard Time).

Booking in advance

The peak season is between December to March as many European travelers prefer the warm sunshine and the golden beaches of Sri Lanka. It is common that most popular hotels are overbooked due to the limited room inventory in the country especially along the coast (Beach Resorts) and in Kandy the Hill Capital of Sri Lanka.

Apart from this period, the months of July & August could be also considered a peak period in Kandy due to the famous “Esala Perahera” which is a must to see for all travelers.Therefore, it is advisable to book in advance if you are planning a trip during the peak season.

Currency / Money Exchange

Foreign currency and Traveller’s Cheques may be changed at any hotel, although commercial banks offer better rates. Converting Sri Lankan rupees back to foreign currency can be done at the airport banks which are open 24/7. Retain receipts when changing foreign currency into rupees so you can exchange rupees back into foreign currency as necessary. Currency notes are in circulation are for 20, 50, 100, 500, 1000, 2000s and 5000 rupees. Please note that the Sri Lankan rupee is not the same as the Indian rupee and has a different value.

Customs Imports

You are allowed to bring into the country duty free 1.5 litres of spirits, 2 bottles of wine, a quarter-litre of Eau-de-Toilette, and a small quantity of perfume and souvenirs with a value not exceeding US $250. The import of personal equipment such as cameras and laptop computers is allowed but must be declared on arrival. The import of non-prescription drugs and pornography of any form is an offence. For additional details please log on to Sri Lanka Customs: www.customs.gov.lk

Customs Exports

On leaving the country you are allowed to take up to 10kg of tea duty free. Antiques older than 50 years, rare books, palm-leaf manuscripts and anthropological material can be exported without permission. Purchase and export without licence of any wild animal, bird or reptile, dead or alive, export of parts of animals, birds or reptiles, such as skins, horns, scales and feathers is prohibited. Occasional exports are, however, permitted exclusively for bona fide scientific purposes. A 450 plant species are prohibited to be exported without special permits. The export of coral, shells or other protected marine products is also strictly prohibited.

Water

Filtered, mineral and bottled drinking water is available at most retail shops and supermarkets. Avoid drinking water from the tap.

Medical Facilities

If you need a doctor, please contact the hotel reception. The hotel will have a doctor within the hotel premises or on call. Pharmacies are available in all towns. Aventra Travels has arranged its own Doctors and Pharmacists for your convenience 24 X 7 via online medical consultation.

Electricity

220 Volts/50 Hz Ac. Two and three pin round and square plugs are used.

Tipping

It is customary to tip drivers, guides and hotel housekeeping/restaurant staff if the service is satisfactory. The average tip is 100 rupees per guest per day for Housekeeping and half of the added 10% service charge in cash to your waiter at a restaurant. This is solely at your discretion.

Map

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Health Protection

Vaccinations are recommended for Polio, Tetanus and Hepatitis A & B. Also, the Typhus vaccination is recommended if you plan to venture outside of tourist areas, especially in the wet season.

Children should be protected against, Diphtheria, Whooping, Cough, Mumps, Measles and rubella.

Dengue fever is common on the island, especially during the rainy season when mosquitoes are in abundance as they transmit dengue. Use mosquito repellent whenever you are outdoors or visiting rural areas.

Language

Sri Lanka has two official languages – Sinhala and Tamil. Although English is spoken and used, it is a link language, rather than an official language. Most people can understand and speak it and you will find signs in all three languages.

Time Difference

Sri Lanka Standard Time is five and a half hours ahead of GMT. (Allowance should be made for summer-time changes in Europe.)

What to Wear

Cotton clothes are useful at any time of the year but you will need light woolens for the hills and waterproof clothing or an umbrella. Modest dress for women is advisable especially off the beach and when visiting religious sites. Don’t forget comfortable shoes, sandals or trainers and cotton socks. If you are planning to trek and climb go prepared with suitable gear. Water sports enthusiasts would do well to take their snorkels and diving equipment along.

Medicine

If you’re new to the tropics, the heat and humidity, mild dehydration, a couple or three too many beers by the pool, and first-time exposure to our hot and spicy cuisine, might leave you feeling out of sorts. Keep a blister-pack of Paracetamol handy (Panadol are widely available in Sri Lanka), plus an antacid and pain killer.

Upset Stomach

Please remember that food available from street vendors, unwashed vegetables and fruit, under cooked fish and meat, peeled fruit at markets and ice creams and milk products at cheap restaurants can be unhygienic.

Credit Cards

Hotels and shops accept most international credit cards. No surcharge is required for their use. Cash advances may be acquired against credit cards at certain bank ATMs. Most widely accepted cards are American Express, Visa and MasterCard.It is advisable to enquire if your card type is accepted by the establishment before the use of any services.

Banks are generally open from 9.00am to 1.00pm from Monday to Friday. Some city banks close at 3.00pm, while others offer night banking facilities. Banks are closed on Saturdays, Sundays, all public holidays and special bank holidays on June 30th and December 31st. ATMs are most found adjoining bank branches island-wide.

Photography Restriction & Permits

Sri Lanka is a photographer’s delight. However, permits are required before you can take photos or video at certain sites. Entrance tickets to individual sites are available only from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. These tickets sometimes may include charges for photography, recording and parking. Rates are quoted in US Dollars and rupee parities are subject to fluctuation.

There are some important restrictions that apply to photography regarding Buddhist imagery. When you visit a temple or other religious site, remember that photography should not be carried out in a manner causing disrespect. For instance, it is strictly forbidden to be photographed in front of or beside any statues and murals. Note that flash photography can damage old murals.

Sunburn

Make sure to bring plenty of SPF-high sun protection and remedies for prickly heat. Wear hats and caps and use umbrellas, and keep yourself well-hydrated to avoid heatstroke.

Safety

Generally, there are no security threats to tourists within Sri Lanka, but it is generally advised to travel with a companion or as a group. It is not safe to travel alone or with little company at night. There’s a special Tourist Police set up for complaints of lost items and you can contact it on this number + 94 11 238 2209.

Banks

Banks are open from 0900 hrs to 1300 hours Monday to Friday. Some city banks close at 1500 hrs, while some are open on Saturday mornings. You can withdraw money across the island at ATMs using international credit cards or debit cards.

Hotel Projects

The attraction of Sri Lanka today is not only that of history, beauty, cultural and the warmth of its people. Together with all this, the country is also on a new wave of progress, and is an increasingly attractive investment center in South Asia.

Aventra Travels (Pvt) Ltd has been arranging short term rental of boutiques, villas, hotels, transport, tours and designing varied excursions in Sri Lank. It is this in depth experience that gives us a better knowledge of ideal locations for setting up hotels, eco lodges and similar investments. We understand the guests and know what attracts them in each of the unique locations we recommend. We take it as our responsibility to ensure our clients are satisfied with the locations of the lands available, accessibility, tourism needs and facilities. At Aventra Travels we make every effort to support investors with information on government regulations, licenses and other requirements with our accessibility & Knowledge.

Our Services available prior to investment:

  • Information on potential tourist investments
  • Help with investment promotion and gathering of information
  • Provision of a directory of land available
  • Help in finding entrepreneurs for investors interested in joint ventures
  • Help in completing application form
  • Organization of site inspection
  • Representation of the investor at meetings
  • Fast-track obtainment of the project clearance permit

Some of the Zones Identified as Suitable for Tourism Development :

  • Colombo and Greater Colombo Resort Region : Negombo, Colombo, Mount Lavinia
  • South Coast Resort Region : Wadduwa, Kalutara, Beruwala, Bentota, Dedduwa, Madu Ganga, Balapitiya, Ahungalla, Hikkaduwa, Galle, Unawatuna, Koggala, Weligama, Mirissa, Matara, Tangalle, Hambantota, Tissamaharama
  • East Coast Resort Region : Arugambay, Pasikudah, Trincomalee, Nilaveli
  • West Coast Resort Region : Kalpitiya, Eluwankulama, Marawila, Waikkala
  • High Country Resort Region : NuwaraEliya, Bandarawela, Maskeliya, Ella
  • Ancient Cities Resort Region : Polonnaruwa, Habarana, Sigiriya, Giritale, Anuradhapura, Dambulla, Kandy, Matale, Victoria
  • Other Resort Regions : Yala, Udawalawa, Wasgamuwa, Pinnawala, Ratnapura

Ceylon Tea, Finest of tea in the world

In 1839 the first tea seeds were brought to Ceylon from Assam and planted at the Royal Botanical Gardens. In 1867, James Taylor marked the birth of the tea industry in Ceylon by starting a Tea Plantation in Loolecondera estate in Kandy, and over the years that followed Sri Lanka has become home to the best Tea in the world, making it one of the largest exporters of Tea.

The beautiful tea plantations blanketing the steeply rising hills are dotted with tea pluckers with baskets bulging fruitfully on their backs. A train journey from Colombo – Kandy – Hatton – NanuOya (leads to NuwaraEliya), Haputale, Bandarwela and Badulla is one the most spectacular journeys of the world. The train passes through numerous unlit tunnels, through dramatic sceneries of green mountains, cascading waterfalls, rivers, deep ravines and brilliant green tea plantations.

Ceylon Tea, Finest of tea in the world

In 1839 the first tea seeds were brought to Ceylon from Assam and planted at the Royal Botanical Gardens. In 1867, James Taylor marked the birth of the tea industry in Ceylon by starting a Tea Plantation in Loolecondera estate in Kandy, and over the years that followed Sri Lanka has become home to the best Tea in the world, making it one of the largest exporters of Tea.

The beautiful tea plantations blanketing the steeply rising hills are dotted with tea pluckers with baskets bulging fruitfully on their backs. A train journey from Colombo – Kandy – Hatton – NanuOya (leads to NuwaraEliya), Haputale, Bandarwela and Badulla is one the most spectacular journeys of the world. The train passes through numerous unlit tunnels, through dramatic sceneries of green mountains, cascading waterfalls, rivers, deep ravines and brilliant green tea plantations.

The Land of Gems

Sri Lanka was affectionately known as Ratna-Dweepa which means Gem Island. The name is a reflection of its natural wealth. Marco Polo wrote that the island had the best sapphires, topazes, amethysts, and other gems in the world. Records from sailors that visited the island states that they brought back “jewels of Serendib”. Serendib was the ancient name given to the island by middle – eastern and Persian traders that crossed the Indian Ocean to trade gems from Sri Lanka to the East during the 4th and 5th century.

Throughout history, Sri Lanka has been known as a land of gems. King Solomon was said to have procured a great ruby for the Queen of Sheba from Ceylon. In more recent times, the Sri Lankan Blue Sapphire glows in the universe due to the Royal Marriage of the Century. This glamorous Blue Sapphire and Diamond Cluster was the engagement ring of the striking and admirable couple Prince William and Kate Middleton. The 12 Carat oval Blue Sapphire at the centre of the engagement ring given to Kate Middleton originally came from Sri Lanka.

At Aventra Travels we arrange Gem Tours inclusive of a visit to the Gem Museum providing a brief history of Sri Lankan gems, visit gem mines and see the how the locals search for gems and if you are adventurous, you too could try your hand at a bit of gem mining and see if you succeed in finding a precious gem stone.

We will take you to some of the best trusted Gem stores offering a wide variety of reputed gem stone. Here the staff would explain the many types of gems in Sri Lanka and the birth stones along with their meanings. Contact us at Aventra Travels for a variety of precious gem stones and jewellery.

Rice and curry

Rice and curry is the staple meal of Sri Lanka, and may be enjoyed no matter where you seek Sri Lanka Accommodation. A portion of rice served by your host or yourself can be accompanied by any number of side dishes, including vegetables, egg, meat, or fish cooked with peppers, spices and often with coconut milk. Other than rice, most traditional meals are composed of the ubiquitous curries and a starchy staple ranging from String Hoppers (kind of noodles made of rice or wheat flour), Hoppers, (cup-shaped pancakes of rice flour), Roti (a flat bread made of wheat and grated coconut) to Thosai (a sourdough pancake). Another unique side dish is Sambol, will definitely be present at mealtimes during your Sri Lankan holiday. Whether you stay in a Sri Lanka Resort or Sri Lanka Holiday Bungalow in the jungle, sambol will be there to tickle your tongue with its slightly hot peppery flavor.

It is made of scraped coconut mixed with a tinge of salt and plenty of red pepper. It may sometimes be finely grounded into a paste, a convenient arrangement if you eat bread with it.Apart from the staple food as described above, Sri Lankan cuisine is a colossal cohesion of influences from our South Indian neighbors, Arab and Moorish traders, and the Portuguese and Dutch settlers. The English influence however is marginal.

Biriyani

Biriyani is a close cousin of the Spanish dish paella and the Italian dish risotto. It is rice cooked in stock with other ingredients added to enhance the flavour of the rice. Biriyani has a distinctive aroma; when cooked it emanates a fragrance detectable from a distance. It is one of the most delicious of all Sri Lankan food preparations of rice. To the rice are added spices, stock, ghee and vegetables or meat to enhance the flavor. The beauty of biriyani comes from the technique of cooking the rice in stock with the meat and vegetables in the same pot- allowing the flavours to seep into the rice as it cooks. Biriyani may be embellished with currants, mustard seeds or coriander leaves to make it more appetizing and meat such as chicken, mutton, beef and even prawns added.

There is also ‘Lamprais’ a Sri Lankan delicacy concocted with rice boiled with in turmeric, coconut milk and spices yellow in colour topped with an onion sambol with plenty of Maldives fish chips. Another accompaniment is Brinjal Moju, a pickled salad. It is lumped with a boiled egg mildly tempered with a large chunk of breast of chicken or mutton wrapped in Banana leaf in a neat square package, which enhances the flavour.Pittu made its way to Sri Lanka with the Malay regiments brought in by the Dutch and the English, now a staple main dish in Sri Lankan cuisine. Pittu is a mixture of fresh rice meal, lightly roasted and mixed with fresh, grated coconut steamed in a bamboo mould.

Biriyani

Biriyani is a close cousin of the Spanish dish paella and the Italian dish risotto. It is rice cooked in stock with other ingredients added to enhance the flavour of the rice. Biriyani has a distinctive aroma; when cooked it emanates a fragrance detectable from a distance. It is one of the most delicious of all Sri Lankan food preparations of rice. To the rice are added spices, stock, ghee and vegetables or meat to enhance the flavor. The beauty of biriyani comes from the technique of cooking the rice in stock with the meat and vegetables in the same pot- allowing the flavours to seep into the rice as it cooks. Biriyani may be embellished with currants, mustard seeds or coriander leaves to make it more appetizing and meat such as chicken, mutton, beef and even prawns added.

There is also ‘Lamprais’ a Sri Lankan delicacy concocted with rice boiled with in turmeric, coconut milk and spices yellow in colour topped with an onion sambol with plenty of Maldives fish chips. Another accompaniment is Brinjal Moju, a pickled salad. It is lumped with a boiled egg mildly tempered with a large chunk of breast of chicken or mutton wrapped in Banana leaf in a neat square package, which enhances the flavour.Pittu made its way to Sri Lanka with the Malay regiments brought in by the Dutch and the English, now a staple main dish in Sri Lankan cuisine. Pittu is a mixture of fresh rice meal, lightly roasted and mixed with fresh, grated coconut steamed in a bamboo mould.

Thosai

Thosai, a Tamil staple is a favourite among all Sri Lankans. It happens to be both delicious and nutritious. The base for this lentil pancake is rice flour with Urad dhal and is baked with sesame oil. Thosai resembles a tortilla, and is eaten with finely ground coconut and chili sambol. The classic accompaniment for thosai is the epitome of Tamil Cuisine – the Vadai, small savory rissoles of ground red dhal. Most Sri Lanka Beach hotels and hotels in Sri Lanka serve these dishes at buffets at least once a week. No holiday in Sri Lanka would be complete without trying these dishes at least once!

Fish Curry and Mixed Rice

The staple meal in Sri Lanka, a dish of rice and curry is typically nutritious and delicious. It is usually a plate of rice piled with several vegetable curries and one meat or fish curry. This dish essentially features the signature spicy flavor Sri Lankan cuisine is renowned for.

Fish Curry and Mixed Rice

The staple meal in Sri Lanka, a dish of rice and curry is typically nutritious and delicious. It is usually a plate of rice piled with several vegetable curries and one meat or fish curry. This dish essentially features the signature spicy flavor Sri Lankan cuisine is renowned for.

Deviled Sweet and Sour Fish Curry

Sri Lanka has a variety of devilled dishes. The deviled sweet and sour fish curry is usually made by first deep frying the fish and smothering it with delicious sweet and sour sauce before frying it again lightly with banana peppers and onions. The dish perfectly complements a plate of fried rice.

Sri Lankan Dhal Curry

One of the most commonly consumed curries in Sri Lanka, Dhal curry is made by cooking dhal lentils with coconut milk to transform it into a rich stew that serves as a gravy for rice. The level of its spiciness can vary depending on the preference of those who consume it.

Sri Lankan Dhal Curry

One of the most commonly consumed curries in Sri Lanka, Dhal curry is made by cooking dhal lentils with coconut milk to transform it into a rich stew that serves as a gravy for rice. The level of its spiciness can vary depending on the preference of those who consume it.

Mallum – Gotukola Sambol

One of the healthiest dishes included in Sri Lankan cuisine, “Mallum” is essentially a bowl of leaves that is similar to western salads. This is made using a type of leaf such as Gotukola mixed with shredded coconut meat, spices and red onions and can be consumed with a plate of rice along with some gravy.

Kottu

“Kottu” is a very popular street food in Sri Lanka made of shredded pieces of local paratha bread blended with an array of spices that are stir fried. A choice of other vegetables and meat or fish is also added. This spicy street food item is simply delicious

Kottu

“Kottu” is a very popular street food in Sri Lanka made of shredded pieces of local paratha bread blended with an array of spices that are stir fried. A choice of other vegetables and meat or fish is also added. This spicy street food item is simply delicious

Jackfruit Curry

Sri Lankan cuisine is famous for its mouthwatering curries and jackfruit is a popular favorite. It is made using the chunks of the fruit which can be cooked in various ways. One version of this dish is cooked in such a way that makes it taste like a curry with chutney.

Galle Literary Festival

When : January (Annual)
Where : Galle
Galle Literary Festival affords visitors an opportunity to appreciate the work of Sri Lankan and international authors, engage in literary discussions and other intellectual and artistic activities. It’s set in and around the UNESCO World Heritage city of Galle.

Independence Day

When : February 4th (Annual)
Where : Various parts of Sri Lanka/Island wide
Independence Day features one of Sri Lanka’s grandest outdoor parades, commemorating the country’s gaining of independence on the 4th of February 1948. Pomp and pageantry are the order of the day as well as displays of traditional Sri Lankan art forms.

Independence Day

When : February 4th (Annual)
Where : Various parts of Sri Lanka/Island wide
Independence Day features one of Sri Lanka’s grandest outdoor parades, commemorating the country’s gaining of independence on the 4th of February 1948. Pomp and pageantry are the order of the day as well as displays of traditional Sri Lankan art forms.

Sinhala & Tamil New Year Festival

When : between 12 – 14 April (Annual)
Where: Island wide
The Sinhalese and Tamil communities in Sri Lanka celebrate the Aluth Avurudda – their mutual New Year. The festival coincides with the end of harvest, so the bounty from colorful fruit trees fuels celebrations. Festivities are prepared well in advance and most of the country grinds to a halt as people travel home to be with their families. A variety of domestic rituals take place, determined by astrological calculations, like lighting the fire and making kiribath (milk rice).

Once all customs are done, the celebrations begin as families gather in the streets and homes are thrown open. The ubiquitous plantain is dished out alongside celebratory feasts of Kawum (small oil cakes), Kokis and Athiraha.

Vesak Festival

When : May (Annual)
Where: Island wide
Vesak is the main Buddhist religious festival in Sri Lanka with people celebrating the triple anniversary of the Lord Buddha – his birth, his attaining of Enlightenment and his passing away into Nirvana.

Colorful bamboo-framed lanterns adorn the interior of homes and luminous displays decorate the streets of towns. Visit Fort, Bauddaloka Mawatha, around the Gangaramaya Temple, to catch this glowing spectacle in full glory.

Vesak also marks the first month of the Buddhist Calendar. This is a day spent in reflective prayer as people cease worldly pursuits and engage themselves in religious activities. Devoted Buddhists pray in temples from dawn until dusk. As the sun sets, devotees partake in processions and return to the temples in the evening to hear monks read stories from sacred texts.

Roadside stalls distribute free refreshments to passers-by. There are mime and street theatre performances, staged on tall platforms near temples in cities and towns throughout the country.

Vesak Festival

When : May (Annual)
Where: Island wide
Vesak is the main Buddhist religious festival in Sri Lanka with people celebrating the triple anniversary of the Lord Buddha – his birth, his attaining of Enlightenment and his passing away into Nirvana.

Colorful bamboo-framed lanterns adorn the interior of homes and luminous displays decorate the streets of towns. Visit Fort, Bauddaloka Mawatha, around the Gangaramaya Temple, to catch this glowing spectacle in full glory.

Vesak also marks the first month of the Buddhist Calendar. This is a day spent in reflective prayer as people cease worldly pursuits and engage themselves in religious activities. Devoted Buddhists pray in temples from dawn until dusk. As the sun sets, devotees partake in processions and return to the temples in the evening to hear monks read stories from sacred texts.

Roadside stalls distribute free refreshments to passers-by. There are mime and street theatre performances, staged on tall platforms near temples in cities and towns throughout the country.

National Kite Festival

When : August (Annual)
Where: Colombo
A festival of color and life, the National Festival of Kites is the place where creativity soars to the heights unreached as people from all age groups and backgrounds display their handiwork and paint the skies, each with a different shade. Kite festival Competitors could be any person, group or organization but the festival is open to all. Kites are in all shapes and sizes and are usually made with dried leaves and colorful papers and sarees. There usually competitions for longest kite or the most innovative kite with natural resources among many others.

Holy Adam’s Peak

When : December – May (Annual)
Where: Adam’s Peak

Adam’s Peak, or Sri Pada as known in Sri Lanka, is a mountain (2243 m) located in the south of the central highlands. The mountain features a rock formation that is considered as the footprint of Buddha for Buddhist, Shiva, for Hindu and Adam for Muslims and Christians.
The 1400 m ascent means a significant difference in temperature as you reach the top, and this is exacerbated by the wind. It is not a hard climb but especially on the way down, leg muscles will be overexerted.

The Jan – March period is particularly busy time to climb. Other months see less traffic, and therefore the many stalls lining the path are not open during the “low” season. So bringing food and especially water is important. Many people attempt the ascent in the early hours of the morning, with the goal of seeing the sunrise, others climb in the afternoon to see the sundown. In either cases, torches are needed to see at night, even with full moon. Travelling in groups is always advisable.

Holy Adam’s Peak

When : December – May (Annual)
Where: Adam’s Peak

Adam’s Peak, or Sri Pada as known in Sri Lanka, is a mountain (2243 m) located in the south of the central highlands. The mountain features a rock formation that is considered as the footprint of Buddha for Buddhist, Shiva, for Hindu and Adam for Muslims and Christians.
The 1400 m ascent means a significant difference in temperature as you reach the top, and this is exacerbated by the wind. It is not a hard climb but especially on the way down, leg muscles will be overexerted.

The Jan – March period is particularly busy time to climb. Other months see less traffic, and therefore the many stalls lining the path are not open during the “low” season. So bringing food and especially water is important. Many people attempt the ascent in the early hours of the morning, with the goal of seeing the sunrise, others climb in the afternoon to see the sundown. In either cases, torches are needed to see at night, even with full moon. Travelling in groups is always advisable.

Kandy Esala Perehara

When : August (Annual)

Where: Kandy

Esala Perahera (the festival of the tooth) is the grand festival of Esala held in Sri Lanka. It is very grand with elegant costumes. Happening in July or August in Kandy, it has become a unique symbol of Sri Lanka. It is a Buddhist festival consisting of dances and nicely decorated elephants. There are fire-dances, whip-dances, Kandyan dances and various other cultural dances. The elephants are usually adorned with lavish garments. The festival ends with the traditional ‘diya-kepeema’.